Wine Writing

    The Wall of Wine, Stories, and Consumer Psychology

    I was on the panel of a wine event last week, and one of my fellow panelists was from one of the nation’s biggest Big Box grocery retailers. I asked him, “Will the infamous Wall of Wine be always with us?” and he answered, “Yes. Retail is here to stay.” Indeed it is, as a basic function of human interaction: I buy something wholesale and sell it to you retail, for a profit.

    8 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

    When wine writers host public events

    I’ll be co-conducting a wine-and-food pairing event at Saturday’s big Kendall-Jackson Heirloom Tomato Festival. It’s the eighteenth time the event, which is one of the biggest in Sonoma County, has been held—and I’m embarrassed to say I’ve never gone. Everyone has told me how amazing it is, so I am totally looking forward to it.

    6 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Understanding temperature data? Not so easy!

      STEVE HEIMOFF - - 5 readers - One of the toughest parts of my job—of any wine writer’s job, actually—is finding reliable, historic data on which to base conclusions about terroir. Lord knows, we have endless discussions about terroir, yet most of them are based on anecdotal information and as we all know anecdotes are not reliable.

      Wine Writing: Generalism vs Specialism

      WineDR - - 4 readers - Years ago when I started writing Winedoctor I had a very generalist approach; I would write about whatever took my fancy (as long as it was wine!). A Chilean Chardonnay here, an Australian Cabernet Sauvignon there. After a few years of this superficial go-where-I-am-led writing I decided it would be better to focus on one or two areas, and I settled on two regions of France a ...

      Why young wine drinkers should know about the classics

      STEVE HEIMOFF - - 3 readers - Okay, well, first, I don’t mean they have to know about the classics. It’s not like the occasional wine lover is going to die and go to some awful place reserved for ignorant drinkers if they don’t. Knowing about the classics is not mandatory if you’re like most people—occasional drinkers who like wine’s salutary, gustatory and social effects, all of which are fantastic.

      Are Wine Blogs Dead?

      Cuvée Corner Wine Blog - - 3 readers - There is nothing more vapid than a philistine petty bourgeois existence with its farthings, victuals, vacuous conversations, and useless conventional virtue. ~ Anton Chekhov Do you know what lazy wine-writers do? They look around for easy stories to write; a story which requires very little imagination or effort on their part to publish.

    The latest about Wine Writing

      Wine Writing: Generalism vs Specialism

      … Years ago when I started writing Winedoctor I had a very generalist approach; I would write about whatever took my fancy (as long as it was wine!). A Chilean Chardonnay here, an Australian Cabernet Sauvignon there. After a few years of this superficial go-where-I-am-led writing I decided it would be better to focus on one or two areas, and I…

      4 readers - By WineDR

      The Wall of Wine, Stories, and Consumer Psychology

      …, the top of my little head exploded at that. You know that we’ve been talking about “stories” quite a bit here at steveheimoff.com. Stories are the new black of marketing: the latest, hottest trend in the industry. Until my experience at that tasting, I had not perhaps appreciated the power of a good story, told by a trusted authority figure…

      8 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Telling a story about stories

      …I speak later today at The Exchange, an organization, sponsored by Nomacorc, that periodically gathers “to improve the marketing of wine by creating a forum for the sharing of ideas related to wine marketing.” The topic of today’s gathering, which is at Bardessono, in Yountville, is “Telling the Story.” I’ve been amazed the last few months at how…

      1 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Are Wine Blogs Dead?

      … and intestinal fortitude [insert hand-wringing, tortured anguish here] to declare that all wine blogs are dead. Perhaps, these wine-writers are simply tired of maintaining an active blog, tired of writing notes, tired of the whole concept or they're flat out bored. It's way too easy to throw stones and mock, creation actually takes some sincere…

      3 readers - By Bill Eyer/ Cuvée Corner Wine Blog

      Understanding temperature data? Not so easy!

      …One of the toughest parts of my job—of any wine writer’s job, actually—is finding reliable, historic data on which to base conclusions about terroir. Lord knows, we have endless discussions about terroir, yet most of them are based on anecdotal information and as we all know anecdotes are not reliable. They may be interesting, they may be well…

      5 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      The Short List: Grey Day Blah Banishers

      …Welcome to binNotes | a wine blog Like wine? Like witty, compelling stories about wine? You’ve landed on the right page! by L.M. Archer, FWS Follow binNotes | a wine blog: | Facebook | Twitter | Pinterest ”Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, and which incorporates itself with the grapes, to be changed into wine…

      2 readers - By binNotes | a wine blog

      When wine writers host public events

      …I’ll be co-conducting a wine-and-food pairing event at Saturday’s big Kendall-Jackson Heirloom Tomato Festival. It’s the eighteenth time the event, which is one of the biggest in Sonoma County, has been held—and I’m embarrassed to say I’ve never gone. Everyone has told me how amazing it is, so I am totally looking forward to it. My particular role…

      6 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Why young wine drinkers should know about the classics

      …Okay, well, first, I don’t mean they have to know about the classics. It’s not like the occasional wine lover is going to die and go to some awful place reserved for ignorant drinkers if they don’t. Knowing about the classics is not mandatory if you’re like most people—occasional drinkers who like wine’s salutary, gustatory and social effects, all…

      3 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Nobody Needs This

      …September 23, 2014 Nobody Needs This I’m sure that the category of “Nobody needs this” is larger than I can imagine – usually because I ignore stupid things. But last week I saw this in a store. Add one more thing to the list of items you will ignore in a garage sale soon. Like this: Like Loading... Related About Travis Oke…

      1 readers - By Travis Oke/ Pull the cork

      Carmen Castorina: When a legend retires

      …, and almost no one did it better. So Carmen will be missed. I’ll even miss his little digs about my failure to include Gallo’s Barefoot in the $10 Hall of Fame and his insistence that Notre Dame was as good a school as my alma mater, Northwestern. And we’ll still have lunch now and again; I just hope Aikman doesn’t want his booth. Cause he ain’t getting it. The post Carmen Castorina: When a legend retires appeared first on Wine Curmudgeon.…

      1 readers - By The Wine Curmudgeon

      A writer and his voice

      … as a career move, as apparently others did. The truth is, I wanted to develop my writing skills further—to push into new areas of creative expression, in a way that had previously been denied me. As California editor of Wine Enthusiast, my writing style was severely restricted by the formal norms of the genre: 40 words per wine review, “Voice…

      1 readers - By STEVE HEIMOFF

      Romancing the Score: What do Wine Ratings Really Tell Us?

      …The biggest problem with wine scores is that they evaluate the obvious: how a wine tastes. What really matters is how interesting the wine makes your dining companion. Now that would be worth rating. Indeed, you have to wonder why we rate wine in the first place. After all, it is just a drink. We certainly don’t rate orange juice or lemonade; we…

      1 readers - By Natalie Maclean/ Natalie MacLean

      Drinking the Numbers: What’s Your Wine Score?

      … Continued from Part 1 of Wine Ratings In 2001, Robinson started using a 20-point scale in response, she told me in an interview, to her readers’ request for scores. But only on her web site: her books are “point-free zones” as is her Financial Times column. “The 100-point scores don’t mean much to us in Europe,” she observes. “Points…

      1 readers - By Natalie Maclean/ Natalie MacLean